The Ecothresholds Project

Understanding thresholds in global change and their implications for decisionmaking

The Ecothresholds Project

Understanding thresholds in global change and their implications for decisionmaking

The Ecothresholds Project

Understanding thresholds in global change and their implications for decisionmaking

Fall 2017 Meeting

Meeting Agenda

Meeting Agenda

Understanding Ecological Thresholds in Global Change:
Connecting Science to Decisions and Response
November 7-10, 2006
Hosted by The H. John Heinz Center
for Science, Economics and the Environment

and
 The Nature Conservancy

Download meeting agenda in .pdf format

DAY 1  Tuesday, November 7

3:00    

Arrival and check-in

3:30

Field trip: Wildlife and Habitat Project – Swan Research Project Airlie Campus

6:00

Dinner

7:30

Welcome and Introductions  Tony Janetos, Joint Global Change Research Institute University of Maryland and John Wiens, The Nature Conservancy

7:45

Meeting Objectives: Developing the framework for integrated thresholds Tony Janetos and John Wiens
Overview and Goals

DAY 2  Wednesday, November 8

8:00 – 9:00 Breakfast

9:00 – 10:15 

Panel “Establishing the Thresholds ‘Playing Field’— Concepts and Context”
Introduction: Tom Lovejoy, president, the Heinz Center
Chair:  John Wiens
Panelists: Ed Miles, University of Washington, School of Marine Affairs; Peter Groffman, Institute of Ecosystem Studies; Roger Pulwarty, NOAA Climate Program Office, and Rebecca Shaw, The Nature Conservancy- California

10:15 – 10:45

Break

10:45 –12:30

Plenary Discussion Establishing the Thresholds ‘Playing Field’— Concepts and Context

12:30 –1:30

Lunch

1:30 – 2:30

Panel presentation and Discussion “Where have we been?” Learning from well-understood cases of threshold responses (‘Type 1’) where both physical phenomenon and management/policy response are well-documented
Chair: Jane Leggett, Congressional Research Service

  • Peruvian Anchovy (Kenny Broad, University of Miami)
  • Mesquite invasion in New Mexico (Brandon Bestlemeyer, New Mexico State University)

2:30 – 3:30

Plenary Discussion  — “Where have we been?” Type 1 Cases

3:30 – 4:00

Break

4:00 – 5:30

Panel Presentation and Discussion “Where are we now?” Type 2 Threshold Cases  (Accumulating or accelerating change is resulting in large or sudden changes important to management and adaptive capacity)
Panel chair: Virginia Burkett, National Wetlands Research Center of the U.S. Geological Survey, U.S. Department of Interior
Session I:

  • Woodland forest/tree die-off: US west (David Breshears, University of Arizona) and African Sahel (Patrick Gonzalez, The Nature Conservancy)
  • Drought: Colorado River (Roger Pulwarty, NOAA Climate Program Office) and Columbia River (Ed Miles, University of Washington, School of Marine Affairs)

5:30

Adjourn

6:30

Dinner

DAY 3  Thursday, November 9

7:30 – 8:30 Breakfast

8:30 – 9:00

Report back ‘Concepts and Context’ and Type 1

9:00 – 11:00

Panel Presentation and Discussion “Where are we now?” Type 2 Threshold Cases
Session II:

  • Coral Reefs (Phil Kramer, The Nature Conservancy)
  • Bark Beetles (Mike Bradley, CANFOR)
  • Sea-level rise: North Carolina Coast, Albemarle Peninsula (Jeff DeBlieu, The Nature Conservancy—North Carolina)

11:00 – 11:30

Break

11:30 – 2:30

Break-Out Sessions (and working lunch):

2:30 – 3:30

Plenary Discussion of Break-out Sessions

3:30

Adjourn

6:00

Dinner

7:00

Report back: Type 2

7:30 – 8:30

Panel Presentation and Discussion of Type 3 Cases, “Things that go bump in the night”
Panel Chair: Jerry Melillo, The Ecosystems Center, Marine Biological Lab

  • Ocean Acidification (Richard Feely, NOAA, Pacific Marine Environmental Lab)
  • Terrestrial Carbon Sink Capacity (Lisa Dilling, Visiting Fellow, Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences, University of Colorado, Boulder CO)

DAY 4  Friday, November 10

8:00 – 9:00 Breakfast

9:00 – 10:00

Plenary Discussion  — “Things that go bump in the night” Type 3 Cases

10:00 -12:00

Key insights:  What have we learned over the past three days that advances understanding of thresholds within the context of response and management, and/or reveals new classes of resource management or policy information needs that the scientific community should respond to?

12:00 – 1:00

Lunch

1:00 – 3:00

Meeting outcomes and next steps:  How can we build a process that seeks to recognize and improve understanding of thresholds in the context of existing and future coping strategies? How can we best organize and advance a process of engagement with resource/conservation managers and policy-makers? What does such a process look like and what are the desired outcomes?

Get in Touch

Fall 2017 Meeting Agenda

The full schedule of speakers and activities.

Location, logistics and travel information

For the Fall conference.

ECO THRESHOLDS

A project of THE H. JOHN HEINZ III CENTER FOR SCIENCE, ECONOMICS AND THE ENVIRONMENT in colaboration with THE NATURE CONCERVANCY

The H. John Heinz III Center for Science, Economics and the Environment

Location

900 17th Street, NW • Suite 700 • Washington, DC

Eco Threshold

900 17th Street, NW, Suite 700, Washington, DC

Telephone: 202-737-6307
Fax: 202-737-6410
Email: info@heinzctr.org